WashU study suggests GMO Golden Rice falls short on promises

Philippine genetically modified Golden Rice
Famous for heirloom rice grown on the spectacular terraces of the Cordillera mountains of northern Luzon, the Philippines has become a hotbed for protests over the development of genetically modified Golden Rice. (Photo: Glenn Stone)

Heralded on the cover of Time magazine in 2000 as a genetically modified (GMO) crop with the potential to save millions of lives in the Third World, Golden Rice is still years away from field introduction and even then, may fall short of lofty health benefits still cited regularly by GMO advocates, suggests a new study from Washington University in St. Louis.

ā€œGolden Rice is still not ready for the market, but we find little support for the common claim that environmental activists are responsible for stalling its introduction. GMO opponents have not been the problem,ā€ said lead author Glenn Stone, professor of anthropology and environmental studies in Arts & Sciences.

Read the full story in The Source: Genetically modified Golden Rice falls short on lifesaving promises