Zika Reservoirs

Possible Zika reservoirs in the Americas

The Zika virus appeared in the Americas in 2015, but it has been present in Africa and Asia since the 1940s. Though the spread of the disease has virtually ended, Zika is a “zoonotic” virus — meaning it can be transferred from animals to humans and vice-versa. Even if it were eradicated in humans, it […]

Plastic problem

Solving the plastic problem

Most of the plastic we use today is petroleum-based and nonbiodegradable, creating more waste to crowd oceans and landfills. To address this daunting problem, Arpita Bose, an assistant professor of biology in Arts & Sciences, and her laboratory have spearheaded research on bioplastics. Her lab is among the first in the world to use microbial electrosynthesis […]

Alyanak

Anthropology’s Alyanak named Volkswagen postdoctoral fellow

Oguz Alyanak, an anthropology doctoral student in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, has been selected for a Volkswagen Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Humanities to support his research on the social lives of working-class Muslim men in Germany, France and other European countries. The fellowship, designed to strengthen trans-Atlantic academic relations in the […]

Mother, baby and laptop

‘Making Motherhood Work’: A research-based blueprint for change

Of all western industrialized countries, the United States ranks dead last for policies that support working mothers and their families. Unlike those in practically every other industrialized nation, mothers in the U.S. have no access to federal paid parental leave and no minimum standard for vacation and sick days, and the U.S. has one of […]

Thailand purple rice

Genetic diversity in Thailand’s purple rice

Kenneth M. Olsen, professor of biology in Arts & Sciences, worked with collaborators at Chiang Mai University in Thailand to examine the genetic repercussions of a longstanding practice by individual farmers of saving and replanting purple rice. The study, published in the journal Economic Botany, shows that these traditional farming practices help preserve the genetic […]

Azores, Portugal student trip

Field Notes | Azores, Portugal

Volcanic craters, fumeroles and hot springs mark the rugged landscape of São Miguel island, in the remote Portuguese Azores, where undergraduate students from Washington University in St. Louis traveled to study field geology techniques during their 2018 spring break. Watch the Field Notes video! In this upper-division field geology course (EPS496), the students advanced their […]

Dan Giammar's Lab

New research gives precise look at underground CO2 abatement process

New research by scientists at Washington University in St. Louis sheds light on what happens underground when CO2 is injected into basalt, illustrating precisely how effective the volcanic rock could be as an abatement agent for CO2 emissions. The research, led by Daniel Giammar, the Walter E. Browne Professor of Environmental Engineering in the School of […]

Building in Berlin

Understanding mental illness in a post-socialist city

Lauren Cubellis, a PhD candidate in sociocultural anthropology in Arts & Sciences, received a 2017-18 DAAD Long-Term Research Grant for Doctoral Dissertation Research and a 2017-18 DAAD Intensive Language Course Grant, Goethe Institute. DAAD is the German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst). Cubellis will conduct dissertation fieldwork in Berlin with clinicians and peer specialists […]

Aleppo, Syria degraded ruin

Looking at ‘wastelands’ through a humanities lens

This fall, Nancy Y. Reynolds and Anne-Marie McManus launched the Mellon Sawyer Seminar,  “Grounding the Ecocritical: Materializing Wastelands and Living on in the Middle East.”  “Wastelands” refers to places with material and environmental degradation, ruin, and decay, as well as the social and natural life that inhabits them. “Ecocriticism” is the study of the relationship […]

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